Summer camp countdown

Start the freedom countdown….I’m at about 125 weeks and counting.

All the summer camp brochures are out and circulating now. You can’t miss them at the YMCA, at gymnastics classes and those little ads in the Globe & Mail. They haunt me because they’re useless to me. I can’t send The Little Nutball away until she’s at least 8.

Yet summer camp — SLEEP-AWAY summer camp — has been the Holy Grail of my parenting life so far: two weeks of uninterrupted freedom to sleep, read, putter about, and eat watermelon on my own schedule. To garden without constantly having to stop my mulching or weeding to coach my little assistant, whom I know will get tired and abandon the project in 5 minutes anyway! To read the newspaper without having to constantly make snacks. To sleep at night without having to get up to fetch colder water because her bedside one wasn’t cool enough.

Although, there’s also a side of me that cringes, thinking, “There’s no way she could make it for two weeks without me! (Or her dad, to a lesser extent.)” Although I think I may just be projecting and I’d be the one freaking out. Once you’re a [excuse me, I had to go wrestle away some dead fish that my Little Nutball and her babysitter just extracted from our backyard mini-pond, then help bury them under a tree. The Little Nut's plan A was to keep them in her bedroom...].

Um, yeah, as I was saying, once you’re a parent, what are you when your kids are out of the house?! It’s a question a dear friend of mine is pondering as her son gets ready to leave for university out of town, and it’s something I’ll ponder for the the two weeks she’s at camp, in July 2010. Actually, who am I kidding. I’ll ponder it for a day or two, then I’ll be taking it easy in my hammock.

In the meantime, the summer camp brochures are a form of diversion for me, sort of like leafing dreamy eyed through the Design Within Reach catalogue.

Metformin against metabolic syndrome

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in recent decades became an epidemic. The frequency of this pathology in the adult population in developed countries is not less than 10-20% of the adult population. With the MS in their practice encountered doctors of many specialties – cardiology, endocrinologists, general practitioners, general practitioners, gynecologists. In recent years, increasingly discussed the validity of the diagnosis of MS in children and adolescents, so the question becomes increasingly urgent for pediatricians.

You may know about Metformin for PCOS. Along with other biguanidami it is used to treat diabetes for more than 40 years, but at the end of XX century, when MC was first described, this drug has attracted renewed attention to the doctors. Numerous clinical trials of Metformin, conducted over the past 10-15 years, will provide further knowledge about its therapeutic significance and broaden the indications for its intended purpose. Unlike the chemical structure of Metformin from other drugs in this group, especially its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, the minimum number of cases of lactic acidosis in patients receiving the drug can widely be used not only in the treatment of type 2 diabetes but also in other pathological conditions involving insulin resistance.

Signs of heart attack in women

The most common heart attack symptom in men is the chest pain and most of the women also complain the same. If you feel that you have a long time after the symptoms of heart attack are visible then you are wrong. You must remember that minutes matter in heart problems as the heart is the main organ of the body and any problem to the heart can cause death of the patient. You must call to 911within few minutes of cardiac arrest.
The ‘classic’ chest discomfort is common in both men and women but it is not necessary that it may be present in every case of a heart attack in women. The pressure in the chest and tightening of heart muscles is observed in a heart attack. The pain spreads over the shoulder, arms and neck of the patient. For seeking fast treatment one should know about the signs of heart attack in women. It is very important that more and more women must learn about the signs of heart attack in women and get prepared for any incidence. It has been indicated by the National Institute of Health by their researches that women experiences some new and unique symptoms which are not seen in men. They have also found that the warning signs of heart attack are experienced by women as long as a month prior to cardiac arrest.
According to the research done by NIH on 515 women, 95 % women agreed that they knew the symptoms one month before they experienced a heart attack. They were ignorant about the warning signs of a heart attack in women and also they had some other health problems which created confusion as they had also similar symptoms just like heart attack.

Is phantom energy use haunting your house

Today’s electronic devices suck power even when they’re turned off. From televisions, to DVD players, to computers, to chargers, they’re all drawing power from the outlet even when you’re not using them. Those little LED’s and stand-by modes draw trickles of energy called “phantom power” that can add up to 5 percent of household energy use and about $200 a year on average.

The factor that compounds the problem is the number of devices that we own has also exploded exponentially from three per household in 1980 to more than 25 today (according the New York Times). With new handheld gadgets cropping up at an almost daily pace, this trend is likely to continue.

So, how do we combat these drains on household electrical efficiency? To start you can begin using power strips and turning off the whole strip when you leave the room. You can also be certain to purchase energy efficient appliances, and unplug things when they’re not in use.

It’s better for all to invest in efficiency, and manufacturers of such devices should also receive a clear message that we’re all interested in more efficient devices. Reducing energy use means reducing emissions, so let’s all exorcise the phantoms in our homes.